no bake creme egg cheesecake

No-Bake Creme Egg Cheesecake

I remember the first time I had a creme egg. It was a scorching hot day in the summer holidays, as all childhood summer days seemed to have been, and my sister had bought me one to try. It was practically all melted and the fondant filling oozed everywhere, and I remember thinking that I wasn’t too sure on this odd chocolate treat. Fast forward 20 years and I’m one of those ‘is January too early for Easter chocolate?’ I can’t get enough of them, especially now that they come in miniaturised form. So a creme egg cheesecake was just a natural progression in my eyes…

no bake creme egg cheesecake

I love cheesecake, its one of those really decadent desserts that you don’t feel so bad eating because they’re usually accompanied with fruit or a raspberry coulis. Because a coulis totally counts as one of your five a day right… However, I’m afraid this creme egg cheesecake covers up no sins. Three bags of chopped mini crème eggs enrobed in luscious vanilla cheesecake, with a double chocolate digestive buttery biscuit base. Because if you’re going to go in, go all in.

no bake creme egg cheesecake 1

no bake creme egg cheesecake

This is a no-bake recipe, which in my head means no-fuss and this recipe doesn’t disappoint. Crushed biscuits are added to melted butter to create your super buttery chocolaty base. That’s then chilled while you crack on with your filling. For this you simply pop all your ingredients in a bowl, mix together and then spread onto the chilled base. Da dahhh! I have made it slightly trickier by adding food colouring to a 1/3 of the filling to give it that creme egg feel, but that’s an optional extra.

no bake creme egg cheesecake

There are a serious amount of creme eggs in this – 4 bags of mini’s in fact!! But for an Easter treat I think we can just about get away with it…

Let me know how you get on, and how quickly it goes!

No-Bake Creme Egg Cheesecake

Yield: 8" Cheesecake

10-12 slices

No-Bake Creme Egg Cheesecake

Ingredients

  • 300g double chocolate digestives
  • 100g unsalted butter
  • 560g full-fat cream cheese
  • 100g icing sugar
  • 450ml double cream
  • 1tsp vanilla bean extract
  • yellow/orange gel food colouring
  • 4 bags of mini creme eggs

Instructions

  • Firstly, place your mini creme eggs into the freezer to chill whilst you make the base and filling.
  • To make the biscuit base, blitz the biscuits in a food processor until they are a fine crumb. Then melt the butter either in a pan on the hob or in a microwave, then pour over the biscuit crumbs and stir together until well combined. Tip into a 8" cake tin, (lined with baking paper on the base and sides) and press down firmly and evenly. Then chill in the fridge whilst you make the filling.
  • For the filling, mix the cream cheese and icing sugar together until smooth using a stand or hand-held mixer, this will only take a few seconds. Whilst mixing slowly, pour in the double cream and vanilla. Then increase the speed slightly, and continue to mix until the mixture thickens. This won't take too long, so keep an eye as you don't want to over-mix and split the mixture.
  • Once thick, take a 1/3 of the mixture and place into a separate bowl and add the yellow or orange food colouring to achieve your desired creme egg 'yolk' colour. I used a combination of both colours, but its a personal preference. Then quarter three bags of the chilled mini creme eggs and fold them into the un-coloured mixture by hand.
  • To assemble spread both mixtures onto the chilled biscuit base, dotting the 'yolk' coloured filling randomly. Try not to mix the colours together too much. Then leave in the fridge to chill overnight.
  • In the morning, quarter the final bag of mini creme eggs and add to the top of cheesecake for decoration.
  • Notes

    Will keep in the fridge for up to 5 days.

    http://bakingwithaimee.com/2017/04/09/no-bake-creme-egg-cheesecake/

    easter rocky road

    Easter Rocky Road

    easter rocky road 1

    I love chocolate, but seasonal chocolate is my absolute favourite. Why eat a bar of chocolate when you could eat a chocolate shaped bunny? Or a cute speckled egg? And easter egg chocolate genuinely does taste better than normal chocolate right? So adding Easter chocolate to rocky road was a natural step for me.

    Rocky Road is one of those super versatile, quick to make and loved by all recipes. You can’t really go wrong and you can add pretty much anything you like. For me, crushed digestives and mini marshmallows create the best base and then you can go wild. I added mini eggs, mini creme eggs and mini Malteaser bunnies because apparently I like everything miniaturised…!

    easter rocky roadeaster rocky road

    In some ways I feel a little silly calling rocky road a recipe, when its so simple. You’ll need maximum 20minutes in the kitchen and then the fridge pretty much does all the work. My main recipe tip, is that slow and steady definitely wins the race when melting the chocolate, golden syrup and butter. The different boiling points can mean you end up with a split oily mess, and thats a serious waste of chocolate!

    Once everything is melted and silky smooth all you need to do is chuck all your goodies in and give it all a good stir. Then pop it into a square tin and leave to set in the fridge for a few hours. Then you’ll have 12 glorious slices of chocolatey, biscuity rocky road goodness!

    easter rocky road

    Rocky road is a perfect bake (can we call it a bake?) for Easter weekend with all the little one’s in your life, especially with all that chocolate involved. Though who am I kidding? My mid-twenties self loved making it just as much as I imagine my three year old self would have!

    Let me know if you whip up a batch yourself, and what Easter treats you include!

    Easter Rocky Road

    Yield: 12 slices

    Easter Rocky Road

    Ingredients

    • 350g milk chocolate, chopped
    • 150g unsalted butter
    • 4tbsp golden syrup
    • 100g digestive biscuits (about 7), broken into small pieces
    • 100g mini marshmallows
    • 2 bags of mini creme eggs
    • 1 bag of mini eggs
    • 1 bag of mini Malteaser bunnies

    Instructions

  • Firstly, grease and line a square 9x9 baking tin and set aside.
  • Then melt the chocolate, butter and golden syrup in a saucepan over a very low heat, stirring every now and then.
  • Meanwhile place the biscuits, nearly all the mini marshmallows, half the mini creme eggs and nearly all of the mini eggs into a large pyrex bowl.
  • Pour the melted mixture into the bowl and mix everything together.
  • Pour the combined mixture into the prepared baking tin and scatter the remaining marshmallows, creme eggs, mini eggs and all of the malteaser bunnies over the mixture, pressing them in to ensure the chocolate helps them set.
  • Then place in the fridge for at least two hours to set.
  • Then slice into twelve and serve.
  • http://bakingwithaimee.com/2017/03/30/easter-rocky-road/

    pain au raisins

    Pain Au Raisins

    pain au raisins

    As you read this I will be living it up in Paris probably eating my weight in macarons, drinking red wine and definitely eating pain au raisins!! The French really know how to breakfast, I can’t think of anything better than a steaming mug of hot coffee and a warm pastry. It makes my morning porridge pale in comparison.

    This was my first time making pain au raisins, I’ve made croissants before and other danishes but pain au raisins always seemed a bit tricky! I followed Edd Kimbers recipe to the letter, and it was surprisingly simple. Danishes seem like such an out of reach bake, but honestly give them a try! Yes they’re time consuming, but the majority of that time is the pain au raisins working on themselves while you can put your feet up.

    pain au raisins

    So just to pre-warn you now, if you’re thinking of making these this afternoon I’m afraid thats not going to happen. This danish pastry dough must be chilled overnight, to rest and rise. They’re a labour of love and you need to be up for the challenge. But I urge you not to be put off, they really are so worth it!! And everyone will be impressed with your house wife/husband skills.

    For this recipe you need to grate the butter onto the dough. This really helps in distributing the butter without it getting too warm. Warm butter is your enemy when making pastries! It does look a bit like you’ve put a load of cheese onto raw dough, but its so much easier than trying to flatten butter with a rolling pin. Believe me!

    The turning process is what gives danishes their lamination i.e. all of the delicious flaky layers! You’ll need to ‘turn’ the dough at least three times before leaving it to rest overnight. By turning I mean rolling the dough into a rectangle, then folding up the bottom third and folding the top third over the bottom third so all ‘thirds’ are on top of each other. The dough is then placed in the fridge for at least 20 minutes to chill. Before repeating the process, you then ‘turn’ the dough 90 degrees so the layers are folded in a different direction.

    pain au raisinspain au raisins

    Now I hate custard. Like hate it! But, even I have to admit the creme patisserie is the real star in these pain au raisins. I think it was the vanilla bean paste I used, it really made such a difference to the flavour. Please try and use the highest quality vanilla you can when making it, none of that vanilla essence will cut it! Creme pat is really easy to make, and thickens surprisingly quickly. You can make it the night before with the dough and leave to cool in the fridge, meaning you’re raring to go in the morning.

    To actually make the pain au raisins, you simply roll out the dough, spread on the creme pat and scatter with your raisins. Then its just a case of rolling up and slicing! Make sure you allow for additional proving time in the morning once you’ve created the classic pain au raisin shape. Though they don’t need you to watch over them, so you’re more than entitled to pop back to bed before baking time!

    pain au raisins

    I really hope you love these as much as I did. They taste best fresh out the oven, but the remainders were still enjoyed by my work colleagues the next day!

    Pain Au Raisins

    Yield: 16 Pain Au Raisins

    Pain Au Raisins

    Ingredients

    • 75g raisins
      Dough
    • 60ml whole milk, lukewarm
    • 60ml water, lukewarm
    • 125g plain flour
    • 125g strong white bread flour
    • 7g fast action dried yeast
    • 30g caster sugar
    • 1/2tsp salt
    • 225g unsalted butter, chilled
    • 1 large egg
      Creme Patisserie
    • 1 vanilla pod or 2tsp vanilla bean paste
    • 250ml whole milk
    • 1 large egg
    • 2 eggs
    • 100g caster sugar
    • 25g cornflour
      Glaze
    • 1 large egg, beaten

    Instructions

  • To make the dough, mix the milk and water in a medium bowl to combine and set aside. Then put the flours, yeast, sugar and salt in a bowl of a food processor and pulse to combine. Dice 125g of the butter into small pieces and add to the food processor. Then pulse once or twice just to mix together. Don't overmix at this stage! You still want to be able to see chunks of butter.
  • Tip the butter and flour mixture into the liquids and using a spatula, fold together whilst still maintaining the chunks of butter. Once you have formed a rough dough, tip this out onto a lightly floured surface and work very lightly into a ball of dough. Form into a flat rectangle, wrap in clingfilm and put in the fridge for 45 minutes. Meanwhile, put the remaining butter into the freezer to chill it thoroughly.
  • Remove the dough from the fridge and roll out into a long rectangle three times as long as it is wide - roughly 15x45cm. Take the butter out of the freezer and and coarsely grate it over the bottom two-thirds of the dough. Fold the top third of the dough over the middle-third, then fold the bottom third over the other-two thirds as if folding a letter. This is your first turn. Wrap the dough in clingfilm and chill in the fridge for 20 minutes.
  • Remove the dough from the fridge and turn the dough 90 degrees so that the open ends are facing you. Then repeat the rolling and folding process twice more, giving the dough a total of three turns. Wrap the finished dough in clingfilm and put in the fridge overnight before baking.
  • To make the creme patissiere, place either the seeds of vanilla pod or the vanilla bean paste into a medium saucepan. Pour over the milk and bring to the boil over a medium-high heat.
  • Meanwhile, put the egg and yolks in a heatproof bowl and whisk in the sugar and cornflour until smooth. Pour the boiling milk over, whisking constantly to combine. Pour this mixture back into the pan and return to a medium heat. Whisk constantly until thickened, cooking for a few minutes extra to remove the taste of the cornflour.
  • Pour the creme patissiere into a clean bowl and press a piece of clingfilm onto the surface to stop it forming a skin. Then pop into the fridge to chill overnight.
  • Put the raisins into a small bowl, cover with boiling water and set aside for 30 minutes. This plumps up the fruit and stops them from burning as they bake.
  • Line a large baking tray with parchment and set aside. Roll out the dough on a lightly floured surface into a rectangle about 24x48cm with the short edge facing you, then trim to square off the edges. Spread the creme patissiere across the pastry leaving a clear border of 2.5cm along one far edge.
  • Drain the raisins and sprinkle over the filling. Brush the beaten egg down the 2.5cm border, and then roll up the dough into a tight swirl using the egg washed border to stick the dough together. Cut into 16 equal slices and place onto the prepared baking tray. Lightly cover the tray with clingfilm, and leave to prove in a warm place for 2-3 hours until almost doubled in size and puffy to the touch.
  • Preheat the oven to 180C/160C Fan/Gas Mark 4. Brush the beaten egg over the top of the pastries, then place in the oven to bake for 20-25 minutes until golden brown. Remove from the oven and leave to cool on the trays for 5 minutes, before transferring them to a wire rack to cool completely.
  • Notes

    Pain Au Raisins are best eaten on the day of baking, but can be refreshed in the oven the next day for 10 minutes at 180C/160C Fan/Gas Mark 4.

    Recipe adapted from Edd Kimber's Patisserie Made Simple.

    http://bakingwithaimee.com/2017/02/19/pain-au-raisins/

     

    caramel macchiato cake

    Caramel Macchiato Cake

    Tea and toast. Cheese and crackers. Coffee and cake. Some pairings are just meant to be. But caramel makes everything better right?

    If I’m not keeping it simple with an americano, my Starbucks order is always a caramel macchiato. The strong coffee mixed with vanilla and caramel just works so well. And why not turn the things you love into cake?!

    caramel macchiato layer cakecaramel macchiato layer cake

    I think coffee cake is really underrated. Usually paired with walnuts and a sickly sweet buttercream, it just doesn’t do it justice. This cake though is paired with the dreamiest silkiest buttercream you ever did taste. Its a classic swiss meringue buttercream with 175ml of glorious caramel. AHH. I could just eat the buttercream from the bowl. It was my first time using my KMix to make buttercream and oh god the difference. It just made it so light, and even easier to spread on the finished cake.

    caramel macchiato layer cakecaramel macchiato layer cake

    But, back to the cake! The sponge has instant coffee, a full cup of freshly brewed coffee AND a coffee soak to add when baked. So you could say I like coffee… though the caramel SMB cuts through it all to balance the bitterness out. Now I couldn’t call it a caramel macchiato cake without the signature caramel topping could I? I popped some caramel into a piping bag and went to TOWN. I promise you though, the cake really isn’t as sweet as it sounds with all that caramel flying around. I think thats why I love swiss meringue buttercream so much. It may be richer than regular buttercream with the additional butter, but its so much less sweet! No teeth-grinding icing sugar round here thank you very much.

    caramel macchiato layer cakecaramel macchiato layer cake

    The whole cake was actually surprisingly quick to make, I made it in an afternoon last weekend and I was enjoying a slice after dinner. I also didn’t make my own caramel for once, as it was a spontaneous bake and that sped the process up! I used a jar of Bonne Maman’s caramel and its really delicious if you fancy being lazy too. If not, my recipe for salted caramel here would work really well, just remember to omit the salt. Although salted caramel buttercream with coffee would be delicious too!

    caramel macchiato cakecaramel macchiato cake

    Let me know if you try it, it’s the perfect Sunday afternoon treat with, you guessed it, a cup of coffee!

    Caramel Macchiato Cake

    Caramel Macchiato Cake

    Ingredients

      Cake
    • 390g plain flour
    • 2 1/2tsp baking powder
    • 1/2tsp salt
    • 1tsp instant coffee granules or espresso powder
    • 225g unsalted butter
    • 300g caster sugar
    • 67g soft light brown sugar
    • 2tsp vanilla extract
    • 4 eggs, room temperature
    • 188ml whole milk
    • 188ml strong, hot coffee
      Coffee Soak
    • 125ml water
    • 100g caster sugar
    • 1tsp instant coffee granules or espresso powder
      Caramel Swiss Meringue Buttercream
    • 150ml egg whites, room temperature
    • 250g caster sugar
    • 450g unsalted butter, room temperature cubed
    • 1tsp vanilla extract
    • 175ml caramel (plus extra for drizzle)

    Instructions

  • Firstly, preheat the oven to 175C/Gas Mark 4 and grease and line three 8-inch cake tins.
  • In a small bowl sift together the flour, baking powder, salt and espresso powder and set aside.
  • Then using an electric mixer, beat the butter for a few minutes until smooth. Add both the sugars and increase the speed to medium-high. Keep mixing until the butter and sugars are creamed together and the mixture is light and fluffy.
  • With the mixer on low, add in the vanilla extract followed by the eggs one at a time making sure they are each fully incorporated.
  • Then in alternating batches, add in half of the dry ingredients, the whole milk and the remaining dry ingredients mixing on low in between. Only mix until the batter is just combined. Then with the mixer on low, stream in the hot coffee and mix until smooth.
  • Evenly distribute the batter between the three pans, and bake for 24-26 minutes until a cocktail stick inserted into the centre of the cakes comes out clean. Let the cakes cool in the tins for 10 minutes on a wire rack, before removing the cakes from the tins.
  • For the coffee soak, pour all the ingredients into a saucepan and place over a medium-high heat. Bring the mixture to a slight boil, then lower the heat and simmer for about 5-10 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside to cool until ready to use.
  • For the swiss meringue buttercream, place the egg whites and sugar in the bowl of an electric mixer and gently whisk by hand to combine. Then place over a saucepan of simmering water, making sure the bottom of the bowl doesn't touch the water. Whisking occasionally heat the egg mixture until it reaches 160F (70C) on a candy thermometer. Once you've reached the right temperature, take the bowl off the heat and fit onto a stand mixer. Using the whisk attachment, whisk the mixture for 8-10 minutes until it holds medium-stiff peaks. When done, the outside of the bowl should have reached room temperature. Stop the mixer and swap the whisk attachment out for the paddle.
  • Then with the mixer on low, add in the butter a few cubes at a time, then the vanilla and finally the caramel. Once all incorporated, turn the mixer up to medium-high and beat for 3-5 minutes until the buttercream is silky smooth.
  • To assemble the cake, place one of the sponges onto your serving plate, brush liberally with the coffee soak and spread on 1/4 of the buttercream. Repeat with the next sponge, and then place the final sponge on top brushing with the remaining coffee soak. Cover the entire cake with the remaining buttercream, smoothing or swirling as desired. Finally place the remaining caramel into a piping bag and drizzle over back and forth.
  • Notes

    Can be kept air-tight for up to one week.

    Adapted from The Cake Blog's Caramel Cuppuccino Cake.

    http://bakingwithaimee.com/2017/02/05/caramel-macchiato-cake/